Archaeological zones in Mexico will reopen as of September

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Teotihuacán (Edomex), Monte Albán (Oaxaca), Tulum (Quintana Roo) and El Tajín (Veracruz) will again receive visitors after a long period of closure due to the coronavirus pandemic.

During her participation in the afternoon conference that took place on Monday, the Secretary of Culture, Alejandra Frausto, announced the calendar for the reopening of cultural spaces in Mexico after the closure period due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The official pointed out that, although some venues have already opened their doors, such as the Cineteca Nacional  and Los Pinos, most of the cultural sites will begin to receive visitors from September , such is the case of the archaeological zones. 

We recommend: “It is time to return to cultural activities”: Alejandra Frausto “The reopening of spaces, museums and archaeological zones of the INAH is scheduled as of September 7 in a phased manner,” she said. 

According to data from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), it has under its protection a total of 193 archaeological zones and one paleontological zone, which remained closed for several months to avoid the increase in the contagion of covid-19.

In Mexico City, there are 4 zones protected by the INAH that will reopen their doors in September. These are:

Cuicuilco, located south of the Federal District, in the delegation of Tlalpan.

Templo Mayor, a site in the Historic Center, next to the Zócalo plateau, in the Cuauhtémoc delegation.

Tlatelolco , which is located on one side of the Plaza de las Tres Culturas, in the heart of the Tlatelolco Housing Unit.

Cerro de la Estrella , the name by which this hill has been known since colonial times, but in pre-Hispanic times this hill was called Huixachtlan, a place of thorns.

Teotihuacán (Edomex), Monte Albán (Oaxaca), Tulum (Quintana Roo), El Tajín (Veracruz) and Chichén Itzá (Yucatán) are other recognized archaeological sites in Mexico that will also receive tourists again.

Source: milenio.com

The Mexico City Post